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Among the many treatments for fibromyalgia is cannabidiol, or CBD, a compound derived from some cannabis plants. Often consumed as an oil, the side effects of CBD are minimal, but researchers are still unsure whether it works. Here, learn how CBD may reduce symptoms of fibromyalgia and when it may be most effective. [...]
Fri, Apr 13, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
Have your social media accounts become a source of stress more than one of enjoyment? Read this Spotlight and learn why you may want to consider a detox. [...]
Fri, Apr 13, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
When Vyvanse starts to wear off, or when a person stops taking the medication suddenly, they may experience a Vyvanse crash. This ADHD medication can cause severe withdrawal symptoms such as fatigue or depression. In this article we look at methods a person can use to help cope with the symptoms of a Vyvanse crash. [...]
Fri, Apr 13, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
Adderall is a stimulant medication that is used to treat ADHD or narcolepsy. When a person stops taking Adderall too quickly, they can experience withdrawal symptoms, such as sleep problems or depression. Here, we look at the causes and timeline of an Adderall crash and give tips and remedies for coping if it happens. [...]
Fri, Apr 13, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
If you're a 'night owl,' you might want to change your bedtime habits; researchers reveal that late nights could raise the risk of early death. [...]
Fri, Apr 13, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
A study reveals that levels of a protein called beta-amyloid — which is associated with Alzheimer's — increase after a single night of sleep deprivation. [...]
Thu, Apr 12, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
Holocaust Trauma Impacts How Survivors' Offspring Cope with Stress of Caregiving
A new Israeli study shows that the trauma of the Holocaust left an intergenerational mark on families, manifesting in how the adult children of survivors cope with stress, particularly as it relates to caring for their elderly parents. Psychology researchers have long disagreed over whether the trauma of the Holocaust has permanently transferred into the offspring of survivors. Some argue that the children of Holocaust survivors exhibit impressive resilience and do not differ in major health markers — such as symptoms of depression and anxiety — from the general population. Other researchers posit that the overwhelming suffering experienced by Holocaust survivors has lingered across generations, thereby affecting their offspring and other kin. In an effort to bridge these contradicting views, a third theory suggests that the offspring of survivors are generally resilient, yet their vulnerability is exposed when they are coping with prolonged stress. With this new theory in mind, the Bar-Ilan University researchers conducted a three-part study examining the way in which adult offspring of Holocaust survivors cope with stressful situations related to serving as caregivers for their elderly parents. Their findings are published in the journal Aging & Mental Health. In the first part of the study, the researchers conducted intensive interviews with 10 adult offspring who were acting as caregivers to their survivor parents. The respondents shared their concerns regarding their parents' condition, and emphasized their desire to protect their parents from any additional suffering. They also noted the unique difficulties in caring for traumatized parents, such as their resistance to being treated by Jewish physicians with German names. In the second part of the study, the researchers interviewed 60 adult offspring, half of whose parents survived the Holocaust and half whose parents were not directly exposed to the Holocaust. The researchers found that the offspring of survivors expressed a greater commitment to caring for their parents and also felt greater anxiety regarding their parents' condition, compared to their counterparts. In the third portion of the study, the researchers interviewed 143 parent-child dyads (some with Holocaust background and some without). The researchers found much greater levels of commitment and anxiety among the offspring of survivors who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “These findings have some important practical implications for practitioners assisting adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in caring for their parents,” said Professor Amit Shrira, of the Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences. “Practitioners should help both sides process negative emotions, resolve conflictual and problematic relationships, and [...]
Thu, Apr 12, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Brain Biomarker Predicts Success of Depression Treatment
New research offers hope that a noninvasive intervention can predict which individuals will or will not respond to drug treatment for depression. Currently, 10 to 30 percent of individuals fail to respond to an initial course of care. Investigators found that an electroencephalogram or EEG can detect electrical activity in a brain region that corresponds to a patient's response to an antidepressant. The paper appears in JAMA Psychiatry, and was jointly first-authored by Diego A. Pizzagalli, Ph.D., and Christian A. Webb, Ph.D. “Our work shows that we could predict a patient's response to an antidepressant by looking at the activation level of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) region of the brain by using an EEG,” said Pizzagalli. Pizzagalli is director of the McLean Hospital Imaging Center. Webb is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and director of the Treatment and Etiology of Depression in Youth Laboratory. In the study, researchers discovered that certain markers in the brain could allow clinicians to identify patients with a high or low likelihood of responding to certain treatments for depression. Webb said that this is the first study to show that activity in this brain region predicts the likelihood of treatment response above and beyond what was suggested by clinical and demographic characteristics. For this study, the team built upon Pizzagalli's previous work showing that EEG recordings of ACC activity could predict the eventual response. “In that prior study, we saw that the higher the activity before the start of the treatment, the better the clinical response months later,” noted Pizzagalli. For the new study, more than 300 patients were tested at four sites in the United States, using sertraline (brand name Zoloft) for the treatment group. “We showed that the brain marker predicted clinical response eight weeks later, even when statistically controlling for demographics and clinical variables previously linked to treatment response,” said Pizzagalli. “For those with the marker of good response, a clinician could tell patients that they have a high chance of benefitting from the intervention, and they should stay engaged in treatment,” he explained. Conversely, he said, for patients with the marker of low response, “clinicians could decide to start with more aggressive treatment at the outset, such as a combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy, and importantly, monitor these patients more closely.” Soon, Webb, Pizzagalli, and their colleagues plan to deploy these approaches on patients at McLean Hospital to determine whether they can lead to treatment-specific predictions. “Our vision [...]
Thu, Apr 12, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Researchers have associated a diagnosis of epilepsy with a greater risk of suicide, accidental drug poisoning, and other unnatural causes of death. [...]
Thu, Apr 12, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
School-Based Yoga May Help Kids Reduce Stress, Anxiety
A new study adds to the growing evidence that yoga and mindfulness can help reduce stress and improve mental health in people of all ages. Researchers at Tulane University found that third-graders who participated in a school-based yoga and mindfulness program experienced reduced anxiety and improved well-being and emotional health. The findings are published in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management. For the study, researchers collaborated with a public school in New Orleans to incorporate mindfulness and yoga to the school's existing empathy-based program designed for students who need need extra support. The researchers targeted third grade because it is a crucial time of transition for elementary students when academic expectations are increasing. “Our initial work found that many kids expressed anxious feelings in third grade as the classroom work becomes more developmentally complex,” said principal author Dr. Alessandra Bazzano, associate professor of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Public Health. “Even younger children are experiencing a lot of stress and anxiety, especially around test time.” At the beginning of the school year, the young participants were evaluated for symptoms of anxiety and randomly assigned to one of two groups: a control group and an intervention group. The control group of 32 students continued in the regular program, which included counseling and other activities guided by a school social worker. The intervention group of 20 students participated in small group yoga/mindfulness activities for eight weeks using a Yoga Ed curriculum. The sessions, which took place at the beginning of the school day, included breathing exercises, guided relaxation and several traditional yoga poses appropriate for children. The research team assessed each child's health-related quality of life before and after the intervention, using two widely recognized research tools. The Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale-Peabody Treatment Progress Battery version was used to assess life satisfaction, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory evaluates psychosocial conditions and emotional well-being at the beginning, middle and end of the study. “The intervention improved psychosocial and emotional quality of life scores for students, as compared to their peers who received standard care,” said Bazzano. “We also heard from teachers about the benefits of using yoga in the classroom, and they reported using yoga more often each week, and throughout each day in class, following the professional development component of intervention.” Source: Tulane University [...]
Wed, Apr 11, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Not Letting Go of Stress Can Impact Health a Decade Later
New research discovers it is important to learn how to keep stress from lingering and carrying over to the next day. Investigators found that people who allow their negative emotional responses to stress to persist into the following day have an increased risk of health problems and physical limitations later in life. “Our research shows that negative emotions that linger after even minor, daily stressors have important implications for our long-term physical health,” said psychological scientist Kate Leger, a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine. “When most people think of the types of stressors that impact health, they think of the big things, major life events that severely impact their lives, such as the death of a loved one or getting divorced,” Leger said. “But accumulating findings suggest that it's not just the big events, but minor, everyday stressors that can impact our health as well.” Learning to “let it go” is an important factor for improving long-term health. The research findings appear in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. While previous studies suggest a clear association between same-day responses to stress and long-term well-being, the new investigation wanted to assess the impact of lingering emotional responses. That is, does it make a difference if a stressor — such as a flat tire, a bad grade, or an argument — leads to negative emotions that spill over into the following day? To find out, Leger and colleagues Drs. Susan T. Charles and David M. Almeida analyzed data from the Midlife in the United States Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of adults. As part of the study, participants completed an 8-day survey of negative emotion; each day, they reported how much of the time over the previous 24 hours they had felt a variety of emotions (e.g., lonely, afraid, irritable, angry). They also reported the stressors they experienced each day. Then, in a subsequent part of the study that took place 10 years later, the participants completed surveys that assessed their chronic illnesses and functional limitations. Participants reported the degree to which they were able to carry out basic and everyday tasks, such as dressing themselves, climbing a flight of stairs, carrying groceries, and walking several blocks. As expected, people tended to report higher negative emotion if they had experienced a stressor the previous day compared with if they hadn't experienced any stressor the day before. Moreover, the analyses revealed that lingering negative [...]
Wed, Apr 11, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Dissociative identity disorder is a condition where one person develops multiple personalities or identities. It used to be called multiple personality disorder. In this article, learn about the causes and risk factors, as well as how it is treated. We also list the symptoms and how it is diagnosed using the DSM-5. [...]
Wed, Apr 11, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Why does overeating lead to more overeating? And why is it so easy to relapse after dieting? A new study takes the first step to answering these questions. [...]
Wed, Apr 11, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
A new study warns that holding on to small, daily frustrations and allowing negative emotions to perpetuate can truly harm our health in the long run. [...]
Tue, Apr 10, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
A new study in mice shows that manipulating a biological clock circuit alters patterns of aggressiveness that mimic those of humans with Alzheimer's. [...]
Tue, Apr 10, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
A new study outlines the ways in which the risk or diagnosis of depression affects the health-related quality of life for people with cardiovascular disease. [...]
Mon, Apr 09, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Depression
New research explains, for the first time, the molecular mechanism through which stress hormones control weight gain by producing fat cells. [...]
Thu, Apr 05, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
While previous studies have shown that people with insomnia are often asleep without knowing it, new research looks at the brain to explain why that is. [...]
Tue, Apr 03, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
Sometimes, people find they are always nauseous, run-down, or catching colds. They can feel sick with or without vomiting, while nausea may come and go or persist. There are many reasons why a person may always feel sick, including anxiety, stress, pregnancy, and diet. Find out more and about treatments here. [...]
Tue, Apr 03, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
Mild depression leads to changes in moods and behavior. These altered emotions can seem and feel like regular responses. However, depression is a condition that should be addressed, and it can become more severe if left untreated. Here, learn about symptoms and treatments of mild and more serious types of depression. [...]
Tue, Apr 03, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Depression

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Nigel Magowan
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Inner Changes Psychotherapy and Counselling
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