Psychotherapy and Counselling News | Counselling in Manchester | Psychotherapy in Manchester

Psychotherapy and Counselling News

Low doses of naltrexone are a recent, popular treatment for MS symptoms. In this article, we look at the research, action, and side effects of naltrexone for MS. [...]
Wed, Jun 12, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
Telemedicine-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy is as effective as in-person therapy for people trying to manage chronic insomnia, new research shows. [...]
Wed, Jun 12, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is a later stage of multiple sclerosis. This article provides an overview of the condition, including its symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments. [...]
Wed, Jun 12, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Depression
Sleep problems appear to be closely linked to mental health problems among natural disaster survivors even two years after the event, according to a new study that surveyed survivors of the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The findings suggest that sleep health should be a major focus of humanitarian crisis interventions. The 2010 Haiti earthquake was the most devastating in the country's history, killing more than 200,000 people and displacing more than 1 million residents. Two years after the earthquake, researchers surveyed 165 Port-au-Prince residents with a mean age of about 31 years; 52% were men. The team found significant associations between sleep disturbances and peritraumatic distress (i.e., emotional reaction during and immediately after the event), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and symptoms of depression. Resilience did not appear to be a buffer against sleep disturbance. According to the researchers, sleep is often neglected in the aftermath of traumatic events; but in these types of situations, sleep should be considered an important target of mental and physical health interventions. “Our results make the case that sleep health should be a major component of all public and global health programs and specifically in humanitarian crises,” said lead author and principal investigator Judite Blanc, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Healthful Behavior Change at NYU School of Medicine. Specifically, 94 percent of the respondents experienced insomnia symptoms after the disaster. Two years later, 42 percent showed clinically significant levels of PTSD, and nearly 22 percent had symptoms of depression. “This is one of the first epidemiological studies to investigate the prevalence of sleep disturbances among survivors of the 2010 Haiti earthquake,” said Blanc. “Our study underscores the strong association between common trauma-related disorders and comorbid sleep conditions among a group of survivors.” “Findings from our study highlight the need to assess and treat sleep issues among disaster survivors, as they are highly prevalent after a natural disaster and are related to mental health conditions,” said Blanc. “Our work supports the importance of sleep in disaster preparedness programs globally.” The research abstract is published in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented in San Antonio at SLEEP 2019, the 33rd annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS). Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine [...]
Tue, Jun 11, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Night owls often face various health risks due to the misalignment between their body clocks and regular work schedules. A few easy adjustments could help. [...]
Mon, Jun 10, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Depression
A new study shows that adversity early in life affects a child's executive function skills, such as their ability to focus or organize tasks. Experiences such as poverty, residential instability, parental divorce, or substance abuse can lead to changes in a child's brain chemistry, muting the effects of stress hormones. These hormones rise to help us face challenges, stress or to simply “get up and go,” researchers at the University of Washington explain. These impacts to executive function and stress hormones create a snowball effect, adding to social and emotional challenges that can continue through childhood, researchers add. “This study shows how adversity is affecting multiple systems inside a child,” said Dr. Liliana Lengua, a UW professor of psychology and director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being, as well as the study's lead author. “The disruption of multiple systems of self-control, both intentional planning efforts and automatic stress-hormone responses, sets off a cascade of neurobiological effects that starts early and continues through childhood.” For the study, researchers evaluated 306 children at intervals over more than two years, starting when the children were around 3 years old, up to age 5 ½. Children were from a range of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds, with 57 percent considered lower income or near poverty. Income was a key marker for adversity, according to the study's finding. In addition, the children's mothers were surveyed about other risk factors that have been linked to poor health and behavior outcomes in children, including family transitions, residential instability, and negative life events such as abuse or the incarceration of a parent. The researchers then tested children's executive function skills with a series of activities and, through saliva samples, a stress-response hormone called diurnal cortisol. Diurnal cortisol is the hormone that “helps us rise to a challenge,” according to Lengua. Diurnal cortisol tends to follow a daily, or diurnal, pattern: It increases early in the morning, helping us to wake up. It is highest in the morning and then starts to fall throughout the day. But the pattern is different among children and adults who face constant stress, Lengua said. “What we see in individuals experiencing chronic adversity is that their morning levels are quite low and flat through the day, every day. When someone is faced with high levels of stress all the time, the cortisol response becomes immune, and the system stops responding,” she said. “That means they're not having the cortisol levels they [...]
Sun, Jun 09, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Many individuals who are hospitalized for a serious injury are at greater risk for developing post-injury depression and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A new study finds that these post-injury mental health risks are even higher among patients whose injuries stem from a violent event or among those who had experienced previous life adversity. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) observed more than 600 urban black men who had been hospitalized for severe injuries. The team followed the men for three months after hospital discharge to assess for mental health symptoms. For the patients in the study, some of whom experienced previous trauma, childhood adversity and neighborhood disadvantage, acute post-injury stress responses were found to be exacerbated. Almost one half of study participants met the diagnostic criteria for depression and/or PTSD at follow-up. The researchers found that participants with violent injuries (as compared to those with non-violent injuries) had more severe post-injury mental health symptoms. In addition, the study shows the importance of taking into consideration prior life experiences, such as adverse childhood experiences, neighborhood disadvantage, pre-injury health and psychological resources in addition to acute stress responses to an injury event, in order to identify injured patients at greater risk for poor post-injury mental health outcomes. “The intersection of prior trauma and adversity, prior exposure to challenging neighborhood disadvantage, and poorer preinjury health and functioning should not be overlooked in the midst of acute injury care when assessing for the risk of postinjury mental health symptoms,” said lead-investigator Therese S. Richmond, Ph.D., CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing, and Associate Dean for Research & Innovation. The new findings appear in the journal JAMA Surgery. “This study takes a life-trajectory approach, helps inform potential points of intervention to improve outcomes, and adds to understanding both risk and protective factors across the life trajectory in an understudied group at high risk for injury,” said Richmond. “We must integrate psychological care into the very essence of trauma care if we are to improve outcomes from serious injuries. Because symptoms develop after hospital discharge, further developing and using screening instruments designed to predict the future development of postinjury mental health problems is warranted to focus services on those patients at highest risk.” But although addressing the psychological effects of injury can improve health and reduce negative outcomes, a national survey shows that only seven percent of trauma centers incorporate routine screening for PTSD symptoms. The new findings appear [...]
Sun, Jun 09, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
New research shows that growing up in poverty and experiencing traumatic events such as a bad accident or sexual assault can negatively impact brain development and behavior in children and young adults. According to a new study, low socioeconomic status (L-SES) and experiencing traumatic stressful events (TSEs) were linked to accelerated puberty and brain maturation, abnormal brain development, and greater mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and psychosis. “The findings underscore the need to pay attention to the environment in which the child grows. Poverty and trauma have strong associations with behavior and brain development, and the effects are much more pervasive than previously believed,” said the study's lead author, Raquel E. Gur, MD, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Radiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of the Lifespan Brain Institute. The researchers acknowledge that parents and educators are split into opposing camps regarding the question of how childhood adversity affects development into mature, healthy adulthood. Views differ from “spare the rod and spoil the child” to concerns that any stressful condition, such as bullying, will have harmful and lasting effects. Psychologists and social scientists have documented lasting effects of growing up in poverty on cognitive functioning, and clinicians observed effects of childhood trauma on several disorders, though mostly in the context of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). There are also anecdotal observations, supported by some research, that adversity accelerates maturation, the researchers noted. Children become young adults faster, physically and mentally. Neuroscientists, who are aware of the complexity of changes that the brain must undergo as it transitions from childhood to young adulthood, suspected that childhood adversity affects important measures of brain structure and function. The new study was the first to compare the effects of poverty (L-SES) to those who experienced TSEs in the same sample set, according to the Penn researchers. The researchers analyzed data from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, which included 9,498 participants between the ages of 8 and 21. The racially and economically diverse cohort includes data on SES, TSEs, neurocognitive performance, and in a subsample, multimodal neuroimaging taken via MRI. The researchers found specific associations of SES and TSE with psychiatric symptoms, cognitive performance, and several brain structure abnormalities. The findings revealed that poverty was associated with small elevation in severity of psychiatric symptoms, including mood and anxiety, phobias, externalizing behavior, such as conduct disorder and ADHD, and psychosis, as compared to individuals who did not [...]
Fri, Jun 07, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
A new study from the University of Arizona suggests a connection between a bad night's sleep and elevated cardiovascular risk factors. Researchers discovered a sleepless night may result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day. The investigation offers one possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease. The good news is that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) is gaining acceptance as a method to make meaningful behavioral changes to improve sleep. Study results will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal, Psychosomatic Medicine. The link between poor sleep and cardiovascular health problems is increasingly well-established in scientific literature, but the reason for the relationship is less understood. In the new study, researchers set out to learn more about the connection in a study of 300 men and women, ages 21 to 70, with no history of heart problems. Participants wore portable blood pressure cuffs for two consecutive days. The cuffs randomly took participants' blood pressure during 45-minute intervals throughout each day and also overnight. At night, participants wore actigraphy monitors — wristwatch-like devices that measure movement — to help determine their “sleep efficiency,” or the amount of time in bed spent sleeping soundly. Overall, those who had lower sleep efficiency showed an increase in blood pressure during that restless night. They also had higher systolic blood pressure, the top number in a patient's blood pressure reading, the next day. Experts agree that more research is needed to understand why poor sleep raises blood pressure and what it could mean long-term for people with chronic sleep issues. Nevertheless, these latest findings may be an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to understanding the pathway through which sleep impacts overall cardiovascular health. “Blood pressure is one of the best predictors of cardiovascular health,” said lead study author Caroline Doyle, a graduate student in the University of Arizona Department of Psychology. “There is a lot of literature out there that shows sleep has some kind of impact on mortality and on cardiovascular disease, which is the number one killer of people in the country. We wanted to see if we could try to get a piece of that story — how sleep might be impacting disease through blood pressure.” The study reinforces just how important a good night's sleep can be. It's not just the amount [...]
Fri, Jun 07, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy News
Executive function is a broad set of mental skills that are important for achieving goals and interacting with others. People with executive function disorder may find it difficult to organize themselves, focus their attention, and control their emotions and behavior. Learn more here. [...]
Thu, Jun 06, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Voluntary exercise prompted the brain to prune surplus connections between nerve cells and reduced behavioral symptoms of ASD in a mouse model. [...]
Thu, Jun 06, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
A new review suggests that low-grade inflammation may sometimes directly affect motivation. Its authors want to explore possible links with depression. [...]
Thu, Jun 06, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Depression
Some common causes of vivid dreams include sleep deprivation, alcohol consumption, and substance use. Practicing good sleep hygiene may help prevent them. Learn more about the causes of vivid dreams here. [...]
Wed, Jun 05, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
Studies have linked sleep insufficiency to metabolic conditions. Now, new research reveals that varying time and length of sleep could also be a factor. [...]
Wed, Jun 05, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
Adderall is a combination drug for the short-term treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Although it is generally a safe and effective drug, it can cause a range of side effects. Alopecia, or hair loss, is a potential but uncommon side effect of taking Adderall. Learn more here. [...]
Wed, Jun 05, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
New research in mice shows how metformin, a common drug used to treat diabetes and prediabetes, can also help reduce symptoms associated with anxiety. [...]
Tue, Jun 04, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Depression
During deep sleep, the body restores various functions, including energy and memory. There are several stages of sleep, and they are all important. Learn more about deep sleep here. [...]
Mon, Jun 03, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
A new, small trial finds that low-amp electroconvulsive therapy is highly effective in reducing suicidal ideation while having no cognitive side effects. [...]
Mon, Jun 03, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Sleep is important for energy, avoiding weight gain, lowering the risk of heart disease, and reducing stress. Learn more about the importance of getting a good night's rest here. [...]
Fri, May 31, 2019
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
A new international study discovered reduced brain activity and a weaker connection between brain regions among teenage girls with problematic social behavior. Investigators believe faulty neural wiring is a possible explanation for social deficits, including problems with emotion regulation. The study, led by University of Zurich researchers, provides an explanation for why some girls have trouble controlling their emotions. Moreover, the neurobiological explanation is encouraging as it suggests indications for possible therapy approaches. Investigators note that becoming a teenager means going through a variety of physical and behavioral changes in the context of heightened emotionality. For everyday social functioning, as well as for personal physical and mental well-being, it is important that teenagers are able to recognize, process and control these emotions. For young people who are diagnosed with conduct disorder, this process is difficult and may lead to antisocial or aggressive reactions that clearly lie outside the age-appropriate norms, e.g. swearing, hitting, stealing and lying. Researchers from Switzerland, Germany and England used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to discover that these behavioral difficulties are reflected in brain activity. The study involved close to 60 female teenagers between 15 and 18 years old who were asked to try to actively regulate their emotions while the researchers measured their brain activity. Half of the group had previously been diagnosed with conduct disorder, while the other half showed typical social development for their age. In the girls with problematic social behavior, less activity was seen in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, where the brain regions responsible for cognitive control processes are located. In addition, these regions were less connected to other brain regions relevant for emotion processing and cognitive control. “Our results offer the first neural explanation for deficits in emotion regulation in teenage girls,” says first author Professor Nora Raschle of the University of Zurich. “The difference in the neural activities between the two test groups could indicate fundamental differences in emotion regulation. However, it could also be due to delayed brain development in participants with conduct disorders.” Treatment for young people diagnosed with conduct disorders may target several levels: Helping them to recognize, process and express their emotions, as well as learning emotion regulation skills. “Our findings indicate that an increased focus on emotion regulation skills may be beneficial,” says Raschle. Future studies will also look at the efficacy of specific therapy programs: “We will investigate cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that aim to [...]
Fri, May 31, 2019
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy News

Therapy Services

Integrative Psychotherapy
Counselling
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
Trauma-Informed Therapy
EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing)
Clinical Supervision
Life Coaching
Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP)
Ericksonian Hypno-psychotherapy
Online Therapy via Skype / Hangouts
Employee Assistance Programme (EAP)
Open Public Workshops
Corporate Workshops and Training
Closed Group Ecotherapy Workshops
Ecotherapy / Nature-based Therapy
Outdoor Nature-therapy Retreats

Blog Tag Cloud

Anxiety Manchester Anxiety Didsbury Anxiety Disorders Manchester Anxiety Stockport Didsbury Chorlton Psychotherapy NLP CBT EMDR Counselling Stockport Depression and Anxiety Anxiety Counsellor Altrincham Anxiety Treatment Manchester Anxiety anxiety and depression treatment Manchester Insomnia and Sleep Disorders CBT for Anxiety Withington Anxiety Psychotherapy Social Anxiety

Contact Details

Nigel Magowan
UKCP Registered and Accredited Psychotherapist
Registered Member of the BACP
EMDR Therapist
UKCP Approved Clinical Supervisor
Accredited Therapist Member of Anxiety UK

New address:

Nigel Magowan t/as
Inner Changes Psychotherapy
Spaces
Peter House
Oxford Street
Manchester
England
M1 5AN
UK
Website: www.manchester-psychotherapy.co.uk
Email: enquiries@manchester-psychotherapy.co.uk
Phone: 07463 542368 or 0161 881 4333 (Manchester)

Opening hours:
11am – 8:30pm, Monday – Friday

Payment accepted by cash, debit/credit card, direct bank transfer or PayPal

Privacy Policy

Join my email list

* indicates required
What inner changes would you like to make?