Psychotherapy and Counselling News | Counselling in Manchester | Psychotherapy in Manchester

Psychotherapy and Counselling News

New research finds that targeted cognitive training improves verbal and auditory outcomes in people with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. [...]
Sun, Dec 09, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
New research finds that 'hangxiety,' the experience of anxiety during a hangover, is higher among shy, introverted people than it is in extroverted people. [...]
Sun, Dec 09, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
A new study shows that fevers, sore throats and infections during childhood can increase the risk of also suffering from a mental disorder as a child or adolescent. According to researchers, the study's findings expand the understanding of the role of the immune system in the development of mental disorders. For the study, researchers followed all children born in Denmark between Jan. 1, 1995, and June 20, 2012, totaling more than 1 million children. The researchers looked at all infections treated from birth and also at the subsequent risk of childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders. “Hospital admissions with infections are particularly associated with an increased risk of mental disorders, but so too are less severe infections that are treated with medicine from the patient's own general practitioner,” said Dr. Ole Köhler-Forsberg from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital's Psychoses Research Unit. The study showed that children who had been hospitalized with an infection had an 84 percent increased risk of suffering a mental disorder and a 42 percent increased risk of being prescribed medicine to treat mental disorders. Furthermore, the risk for a range of specific mental disorders was also higher, including psychotic disorders, OCD, tics, personality disorders, autism and ADHD, according to the study's findings. “This knowledge increases our understanding of the fact that there is a close connection between body and brain and that the immune system can play a role in the development of mental disorders,” he said. “Once again research indicates that physical and mental health are closely connected.” “We also found that the risk of mental disorders is highest right after the infection, which supports the infection to some extent playing a role in the development of the mental disorder,” he added. The study's findings could have importance for further studies of the immune system and the importance of infections for the development of a wide range of childhood and adolescent mental disorders, according to the researchers. “The temporal correlations between the infection and the mental diagnoses were particularly notable, as we observed that the risk of a newly occurring mental disorder was increased by 5.66 times in the first three months after contact with a hospital due to an infection and were also increased more than twofold within the first year,” said research director Dr. Michael Eriksen Benrós from the Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen at Copenhagen University Hospital. Benrós, the senior researcher on the study, added [...]
Sun, Dec 09, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Very shy people are more likely to experience “hangxiety” — anxiety during a hangover — compared to their more extroverted peers, according to a new U.K. study conducted by researchers from the University of Exeter and University College London (UCL). “We know that many people drink to ease anxiety felt in social situations, but this research suggests that this might have rebound consequences the next day, with more shy individuals more likely to experience this, sometimes debilitating, aspect of hangover,” said researcher Dr. Celia Morgan, professor of psychopharmacology at the University of Exeter in England. “It's about accepting being shy or an introvert. This might help transition people away from heavy alcohol use. It's a positive trait. It's OK to be quiet.” The study involved nearly 100 social drinkers with either high or low levels of shyness. After drinking around six units of alcohol, very shy people reported a slight decrease in their anxiety levels. But by the next day, this slight relaxation was replaced by a significant increase in anxiety — a state the researchers refer to as “hangxiety.” One alcohol unit is measured as 10 milliliters or 8 grams of pure alcohol. The researchers also found a strong link between this hangxiety in very shy people and higher scores on the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) assessment, which is used to help detect alcohol use disorder. “These findings also suggest that hangxiety in turn might be linked to people's chance of developing a problem with alcohol,” said Morgan. For the study, participants were tested at home and were assigned at random either to drink or to remain sober. Baseline measures of shyness, social phobia and alcohol use disorder were taken at the beginning, and anxiety levels were tested again during the evening and the following morning. “While alcohol use is actually going down, there are still 600,000 dependent drinkers in the UK,” said first author Beth Marsh, of UCL. “And while statistics show that, overall, people are drinking less, those with lower levels of health and wellbeing — perhaps including people experiencing anxiety — are still often doing so.” The study is published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences. Source: University of Exeter [...]
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
A large, international study finds that there is a link between an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and sleeping either too much or too little. [...]
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
Valium and Xanax are both benzodiazepines. As sedatives, they have some uses in treating anxiety, but the two can cause slightly different side effects and interactions, and both can result in dependency and withdrawal. Learn more about the differences between Valium and Xanax here. [...]
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
A new study by researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin suggests that a deficiency in vitamin D is associated with a substantial increased risk of depression over a four-year follow-up period. It is well-recognized that later life depression can significantly reduce quality of life and is a potent risk factor for functional decline, admission to residential care and early death. Moreover, the majority of older adults are undiagnosed given the complex nature of depression. The findings form part of the largest representative study of its kind and appear in The Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (JAMDA). Vitamin D is essential for bone health and has recently been linked with other non-bone health outcomes such as inflammation and diabetes. Small studies have found links between vitamin D and depression but few have followed up with the same affected people over time, while others have not taken into account other factors that can also affect depression. These findings are important as researchers discovered that 1 in 8 older Irish adults are deficient in vitamin D. The current study investigated the links between vitamin D and depression in older Irish adults and then re-examined the participants four years later to see if vitamin D status affected the risk of developing depression. The authors found that: • vitamin D deficiency was associated with a 75 percent increase in the risk of developing depression by 4 years; • this finding remained robust after controlling for a wide range of relevant factors including depressive symptoms, chronic disease burden, physical activity and cardiovascular disease; • furthermore, excluding participants taking antidepressant medication and vitamin D supplementation from the analyses did not alter the findings. Researchers believe the findings could be due to the potential direct effect of vitamin D on the brain. That is, given the structural and functional brain changes seen in late life depression, vitamin D may have a protective effect in attenuating these changes. Similarly, other studies have shown that vitamin D status has also been linked with neurodegenerative conditions such as dementia, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. Although the benefits of vitamin D remain debatable, vitamin D status is relatively easy and inexpensive to modify through supplementation or fortification. Interestingly, in Ireland, fortification of food products with vitamin D is voluntary and few manufacturers fortify their products. Commenting on the significance of the research, first author of the study and Specialist Registrar in Geriatric Medicine, Dr. Robert Briggs, [...]
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
The largest study of its kind examines the brains of people living with obsessive-compulsive disorder and offers new insights into the condition. [...]
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Doctors do not fully understand what causes prostate cancer. This disease may have an association with alcohol, but scientists need to do more research to confirm the potential link. Here, learn more about the risks of alcohol, how doctors screen for and treat prostate cancer, and the survival rates for this disease. [...]
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
My name is Carrie Gale, and I am an Emmy-nominated graphic designer and writer. I also have bipolar II disorder. This is my story. [...]
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Depression
In a new study, researchers discovered the squabbling and acrimony between couples in the early and middle years of a marriage decline with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. For the study, University of California, Berkeley, investigators analyzed videotaped conversations between 87 middle-aged and older husbands and wives who had been married for 15 to 35 years. They then tracked their emotional interactions over the course of 13 years. Researchers found that as couples aged, they showed more humor and tenderness towards another. Overall, the findings showed an increase in such positive behaviors as humor and affection and a decrease in negative behaviors such as defensiveness and criticism. The results challenge long-held theories that emotions flatten or deteriorate in old age and point instead to an emotionally positive trajectory for long-term married couples. The study appears in the journal Emotion. “Our findings shed light on one of the great paradoxes of late life,” said study senior author Dr. Robert Levenson, a UC Berkeley psychology professor. “Despite experiencing the loss of friends and family, older people in stable marriages are relatively happy and experience low rates of depression and anxiety. Marriage has been good for their mental health.” The findings from the new longitudinal study are consistent with previous research that revealed wives were more emotionally expressive than their husbands, and as they grew older they tended toward more domineering behavior and less affection. But generally, across all the study's age and gender cohorts, negative behaviors decreased with age. “Given the links between positive emotion and health, these findings underscore the importance of intimate relationships as people age, and the potential health benefits associated with marriage,” said co-lead author Dr. Alice Verstaen, who led the study as a Ph.D. student. The results are the latest to emerge from a 25-year UC Berkeley study headed by Levenson of more than 150 long-term marriages. The participants, now mostly in their 70s, 80s and 90s, are heterosexual couples from the San Francisco Bay Area whose relationships Levenson and fellow researchers began tracking in 1989. In their investigation of marital relationships, researchers viewed 15-minute interactions between spouses in a laboratory setting as they discussed shared experiences and areas of conflict. They tracked the emotional changes every few years. The spouses' listening and speaking behaviors were coded and rated according to their facial expressions, body language, verbal content and tone of voice. Emotions were coded into the categories of anger, contempt, disgust, domineering behavior, [...]
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source Psych Central Psychotherapy Anxiety News
Why do people with depression lose pleasure in daily activities? And why does ketamine help treat depression in some? A new study offers some answers. [...]
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Psychology/Psychiatry
Multiple sclerosis affects the nerves in the body and may also affect mood. Learn more about the causes of multiple sclerosis mood swings, and the best treatment options, here. [...]
Tue, Dec 04, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Depression
New research examines the use of hypnotic drugs in seniors and finds a connection between nighttime exposure to artificial outdoor light and insomnia. [...]
Tue, Dec 04, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
In a comprehensive review, researchers have investigated the impact of being a night owl on eating patterns and evaluated associated health risks. [...]
Mon, Dec 03, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
According to a recent study, snoring increases the chances that a person will experience reduced cardiac function. Women seem to be most at risk. [...]
Sun, Dec 02, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News
Recent discoveries about the brain circuitry that drives depression and addiction may point to new clinical targets for the treatment of these issues. [...]
Fri, Nov 30, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Alcohol/Addiction/Illegal Drugs
In this month's letter, Managing Editor Honor talks mental well-being during the holiday season. How does the MNT editorial team alleviate festive stress? [...]
Thu, Nov 29, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can also experience severe anxiety. A new trial puts to the test an effective coping strategy. [...]
Tue, Nov 27, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress
People have used passionflower for medicinal purposes for centuries. In this article, learn how it may help reduce anxiety and improve sleep. We also cover the possible risks. [...]
Fri, Nov 23, 2018
Source Medical News Today: Anxiety and Stress

Therapy Services

Integrative Psychotherapy
Counselling
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
Trauma Informed Therapy
EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing)
Clinical Supervision
Life Coaching
Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP)
Ericksonian Hypnotherapy
Online Therapy via Skype / Hangouts
Employee Assistance Programme (EAP)
Open Public Workshops
Corporate Workshops and Training
Closed Group Ecotherapy Workshops
Ecotherapy / Nature-based Therapy
Outdoor Nature-therapy Retreats

Blog Tag Cloud

Anxiety Manchester Anxiety Didsbury Manchester Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Stockport Didsbury Psychotherapy NLP CBT EMDR Counselling Chorlton Stockport Depression and Anxiety Anxiety Counsellor Insomnia and Sleep Disorders Altrincham Anxiety Treatment Manchester anxiety and depression treatment Manchester Anxiety CBT for Anxiety Withington Anxiety Psychotherapy Social Anxiety

Contact Details

Nigel Magowan
UKCP Registered and Accredited Psychotherapist
Registered Member of the BACP
EMDR Therapist
UKCP Approved Clinical Supervisor
Accredited Therapist Member of Anxiety UK

Inner Changes Psychotherapy and Counselling
22 Newport Road
Chorlton
Manchester M21 9NN

Website: www.manchester-psychotherapy.co.uk
Email: nigel@manchester-psychotherapy.co.uk

Phone: 0161 881 4333 (Manchester)

Opening hours:
11am – 8:30pm, Monday – Friday

Payment accepted by cash, debit/credit card, direct bank transfer or PayPal

Privacy Policy

Join my email list

* indicates required
What inner changes would you like to make?